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Inhabited by Veslionnais or Veslissiens, the village of Vesly was once associated with Gerville-la-Forêt (in the district of La Haye-du-Puits).


Its church (of St Peter and St Paul) dates from the 12th, 14th and 15th C, and is built over a Merovingian necropolis. It is topped by a fortified bell tower, with corbelled parapets. The church is listed and is one of the largest and finest gothic buildings in the Manche, noted particularly for its chancel on which was modelled that of Carentan’s Notre-Dame.




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A statue polychrome of Saint Walburge, who died in 779, is called upon to heal sick children.


To the north of the village is the chapel of Notre-Dame de la Consolation (13th C) which was restored in 1650 and boasts fine stained-glass windows as well as a 300-year old yew tree in the graveyard. Vesly also has a number of very beautiful period houses (privately owned) such as the Manoir de Bricquebost (16th C) of which the façade in flamboyant gothic style is flanked by two towers and the Manoirs de la Cour, de Briqueville and Moitiers (at Gerville-la-Forêt).


Once a more common sight, there are, also two mills – one a watermill and the other a windmill – at Pissot. The locally-born archaeologist, Charles de Gerville, who was known for inventing the phrase “art roman”, was buried in the village cemetery after his death in 1853.